Authors/Duns Scotus/Reportatio parisiensis

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The reportatio parisiensis is the collective name given to transcriptions of the lectures on the Sentences given by Scotus in Paris. A reportatio is a student report or transcription of the original lecture of a master. A version that has been checked by the master himself is known as a reportatio examinata. (The Lectura, by contrast, are not notes made by students, but rather the lecture notes made by the master himself). There are a number of reportationes of Scotus's lectures at Paris. Scotus himself personally examined a reportatio of his lectures on Book 1, the Reportatio examinata. Note that what the Wadding edition calls Reportatio 1 is actually Book 1 of the Additiones magnae (see below).

  • On Book 1:
    • Reportatio 1A (the Reportatio examinata)
    • Reportatio 1B edition: Paris 1517
    • Reportatio 1C (Reportatio cantabrigiensis) edition: not yet edited
    • Reportatio 1D edition: not yet edited
    • Reportatio 1E (34) edition: not yet edited
  • On Book 2:
    • Reportatio 2A edition: Wadding 11
    • Reportatio 2B (a shorter version and the principal source for Additiones 2) edition: not yet edited
  • On Book 3:
    • Reportatio 3A edition: Wadding 11
    • Reportatio 3B, 3C, 3D edition: not yet edited
  • On Book 4:
    • Reportatio 4A edition: Wadding 11
    • Reportatio 4B edition: Paris 1518

A third collection of questions on books I and I of the Sentences is called the Additiones magnae. These were made by Scotus' secretary, William of Alnwick, and are probably a summary of the longer reportatio of the Paris lectures.

Editions

  • Allan B. Wolter and Oleg V. Bychkov (ed., transl.)John Duns Scotus. The Examined Report of the Paris Lecture: Reportatio I-A, Latin Text and English Translation. Vol. 1. St. Bonaventure, N.Y.: Franciscan Institute, 2004. [Prologue and distinctions 1–21.]
  • Allan B. Wolter and Oleg V. Bychkov (ed., transl.) John Duns Scotus. The Examined Report of the Paris Lecture: Reportatio I-A, Latin Text and English Translation. Vol. 2. St. Bonaventure, N.Y.: Franciscan Institute, 2008. [Distinctions 22–48.] * Klaus Rodler, Die Prologe der Reportata Parisiensia des Johannes Duns Scotus: Untersuchungen zur Textüberlieferung und kritische Edition. Mediaevalia oenipontana 2. Innsbruck: Studia, 2005. [Prologues of Reportatio I A, Reportatio I B, Reportatio I C, and of William of Alnwick’s Additiones Magnae]
  • Allan B. Wolter and Marilyn McCord Adams. “Duns Scotus’ Parisian Proof for the Existence of God.” Franciscan Studies 42 (1982): 248–321. [Latin-English; contains Reportatio I A d. 2 q. 1–3.]
  • Timothy Noone, “Scotus on Divine Ideas: Reportatio Paris. I–A, d. 36.” Medioevo 24 (1998): 359–453.
  • Joachim R. Söder (ed., transl.), Johannes Duns Scotus. Reportatio Parisiensis examinata I 38–44 = Pariser Vorlesungen über Wissen und Kontingenz: lateinisch, deutsch. Herders Bibliothek der Philosophie des Mittelalters 4. Freiburg im Breisgau: Herder, 2005.

Wadding

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